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Pigs

Ratchaburi Farm Biogas

This project is generating renewable energy from pig manure in Thailand. By capturing methane and generating electricity from biogas, this project reduces the amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced by pig farming. Furthermore, the new treatment system provides an affordable source of fertilizer while lessening pollution and other negative impacts on the surrounding environment and community.

Where & Why

Agriculture is responsible for just over 14% of Thailand’s greenhouse gas emissions. It is the leading source of methane, accounting for 70% of the country total. When it comes to pig farming, manure management is the primary source of emissions.

In Thailand, the most common way that farmers treat their pig manure is via anaerobic lagoon systems that store the slurry in uncovered ponds. As the manure breaks down, it releases harmful methane emissions into the air which have 21 times the global warming potential of carbon dioxide. 

However, emissions aren’t the only harmful side effect of this process. When waste is contained in open ponds it can cause foul odors that bother neighboring residents. There is also a greater risk of overflows during the rainy season which can lead to wastewater pollution.

How & Who

Through this project, one pig farm in Thailand’s Ratchaburi province is employing a different, more sustainable method to treat its pig waste. By replacing their old lagoon system with a closed anaerobic system, SPM Farm is able to capture the methane rich biogas that is produced during treatment. This biogas is then combusted using spark ignition engines to produce electricity that can be used on-site. This new source of power replaces the electricity that currently comes from the grid. Furthermore, any excess electricity produced by the farm will be sent to the national grid. By generating a renewable source of energy and reducing the farm’s reliance on fossil-fuel, this project will avoid over 3,000 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions each year.   

Along with generating electricity, the waste treatment process also produces a fertilizer that can be supplied to local farmers at low cost and is distributed for free to schools where it is used to grow food for students. 

Because it is enclosed, the new treatment system also helps to prevent some of the other negative impacts of manure management, including wastewater overflows, groundwater contamination, and unpleasant odors. This project is intended to drive further adoption of waste-to-energy systems by building confidence among Southeast Asian farmers in the efficacy, cost and safety of this newer type of technology.

Environmental Benefits

  • Combats climate change by reducing reliance on fossil fuels for energy generation
  • Reduces the risk of wastewater pollution 

Community Benefits

  • Reduces offensive odors
  • Reduces risk of groundwater contamination and resulting health problems
  • Improves access to low cost fertilizers for food production

Project Type

Energy

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

3,379 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standard

Project Developers

SPM Feedmill Co., Ltd

Project Documents

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Cambodia biogas

Cambodia Biodigesters

This project is installing biogas digesters in rural Cambodia, which convert animal manure into a renewable source of energy. By reducing the need to burn wood indoors, the project reduces greenhouse gas emissions, prevents deforestation, and improves indoor air quality.

Where & Why

In Cambodia, many rural families lack access to electricity and are forced to cook their meals over open wood fires. This releases harmful pollutants into the air which can cause health problems such as stroke, heart disease, and lung cancer. Worldwide, nearly 4 million people die each year as a result of indoor air pollution. 

Along with these health concerns, cooking over wood fires is also harmful to the environment. Sourcing the wood depletes local forest resources, while burning it releases high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Relying on wood fuel also places an extra burden on women who are typically responsible for gathering and cooking over it. The more time that women spend collecting wood and cooking, the less time they have for education, work, or socializing with their family. 

At the same time, many rural Cambodian families raise livestock and struggle to dispose of their herd’s waste in a hygienic manner. This coupled with poor sanitation leads to diseases, such as diarrhea. Additionally, the cow or pig dung releases harmful methane emissions as it breaks down.

How & Who

This project is installing dome biogas digesters outside of households in rural Cambodia. To date, more than 27,000 digesters have been installed; this phase of the project aims to install 8,600 more. Local people are trained as masons and earn an income constructing the digesters. These digesters convert the animal waste into biogas – a much cleaner, renewable fuel source. The biogas is then piped into households where families can use it for cooking and lighting. Because families are able to use the manure produced by their own cows or pigs to feed the digesters, the biogas is a highly affordable energy source. 

Along with biogas, the digesters produce bio-slurry, which is the remaining treated animal waste. This bio-slurry is rich in nutrients and can be used by farmers to fertilize their fields and increase their crop yields. This reduces the need for harmful chemical fertilizers. Because the bio-slurry has been hygienically treated, the project also helps prevent diseases caused by poor animal waste management. 

Thanks to their new biogas fuel, families no longer need to prepare their meals over wood fires. As a result, the project improves indoor air quality and reduces deforestation. Each digester is expected to prevent around 3MT of CO2 emissions each year. 

The use of biogas also cuts down the amount of time that women spend on tasks like collecting wood, cooking over the fires, and cleaning soot off of their pots and pans. The project further promotes gender equality by ensuring women are included in trainings and village meetings.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Fights deforestation
  • Produces organic fertilizer

Community Benefits

  • Trains local community members 
  • Creates jobs
  • Provides an affordable energy source
  • Improves indoor air quality 
  • Improves hygiene and health
  • Improves living conditions of women 
  • Increases local food security

Project Type

Energy

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

10,000 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standard

Project Developers

Cambodia’s National Biodigester Programme

Project Documents

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Cerro de Hula Wind Farm

Cerro de Hula Wind Farm

This project reduces Honduras’ reliance on foreign oil imports by generating a supply of renewable wind energy. The project advances sustainable development in Honduras by electrifying rural communities and creating local employment opportunities.

Where & Why

Over the past two decades, electricity consumption in Honduras has nearly quadrupled. Though Honduras possesses an abundance of renewable energy sources, about half (51%) of the country’s energy supply still comes from oil. When oil is burned to heat or light homes, it releases carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Furthermore, because Honduras imports all of its oil from abroad, this dependence results in dollars leaving the local economy. 

Though electricity access has greatly improved in Honduras in recent years, many families still live without it. Approximately 42% of Honduras’ population lives in rural areas, making electric connectivity challenging. As of 2018, about two in 10 rural Hondurans (nearly 800,000 people) still lack access to electricity.  

How & Who

The Cerro de Hula project will build a 51-turbine wind farm in a rural region of Honduras. Every year, these powerful turbines will provide 345,790 MWh of renewable energy to the Honduran electric grid. The energy produced by the wind farm will replace existing fossil fuel sources and is expected to reduce more than 220,000 metric tons of carbon each year. As the first grid-connected wind energy project in Honduras, Cerro de Hula serves as a scalable model for clean energy generation. 

Along with advancing the clean energy transition, this project contributes to sustainable development in Honduras by electrifying rural communities. About half of Honduras’ population lives in poverty, and the percentage is even higher (60%) in rural areas. Energy access plays an important role in poverty alleviation by enabling children to study at night, powering modern hospital equipment, and more. The project also promotes economic growth by reducing the country’s reliance on foreign imports and employing local people to construct and operate the wind farm.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by providing clean energy

Community Benefits

  • Improves electricity access in rural areas
  • Creates local jobs
  • Contributes to social and economic development

Project Type

Energy

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

226,978 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standard

Project Developers

CMI (Corporación Multi Inversiones)

Project Documents

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Turbines at Big Smile Wind Farm

Big Smile Wind Farm

This wind farm generates enough renewable energy to power over 45,000 homes. By generating clean wind energy, this project reduces the USA’s heavy reliance on fossil fuels and avoids harmful CO2 emissions.

Where & Why

Over 80% of the energy used in the USA is generated from fossil fuels such as crude oil, coal and natural gas. The excavation and processing of these fuels can take an enormous toll on landscapes. The pipelines, access roads and other infrastructure that powers the fossil fuel industry can destroy natural habitats and displace communities.  Acidic run-off from coal mining operations can end up in rivers and streams, polluting drinking water and freshwater ecosystems. 

Fossil fuels are burned to create energy to heat and light homes and businesses, and to power a huge number of other appliances. This burning creates a vast amount of carbon dioxide emissions which are trapped in the earth’s atmosphere and increase global warming and climate change.

How & Who

The Big Smile Wind Farm at Dempsey Ridge is located on more than 7,500 acres of agricultural and grazing land in Oklahoma. Sixty-six wind turbines will deliver enough renewable energy to power more than 46,000 U.S. homes. By generating clean, wind energy, the project reduces reliance on environmentally damaging fossil fuels. Careful steps were taken to minimize the environmental impacts of the wind farm and prevent harm to birds, bats, and natural habitats. 

More than 130 people were employed during the construction phase of the project. The ongoing operation of the wind farm will also create 13 new full-time local jobs. Additionally, the wind farm will provide an additional revenue stream for local farmers who are paid to host the turbines on their property. In addition to the lease agreements with landowners, the project will produce increased revenues for local counties through investments in local infrastructure and property tax revenues. 

Environmental Benefits

  • Improves air quality
  • Mitigates climate change by reducing reliance on fossil fuels
  • Reduces land degradation and water pollution caused by fossil fuel extraction

Community Benefits

  • Creates jobs 
  • Provides additional revenues for local communities
  • Increases Investments in local infrastructure

Project Type

Energy

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

339,000 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

ACCIONA

Project Documents

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Costa Rica Carbon Offset Wind Farm Project

Costa Rica Grouped Wind Project

This project will develop four wind farms which will provide power for Costa Rica’s electricity grid. Greenhouse gas emissions will be prevented by reducing reliance on fossil-fuel power plants.

Where & Why

Fossil fuels, such as oil, coal, and natural gas, are the world’s primary energy source. However, burning these fuels to generate electricity produces carbon emissions and comes at a cost to the planet. In addition to contributing to climate change, fossil fuel power generation can also lead to poor air quality and water pollution, which can be harmful to ecosystems and human health.

How & Who

This project reduces reliance on fossil fuels and prevents future greenhouse gas emissions by developing four wind farms in Costa Rica’s Guanacaste province. These new wind farms will generate 382,634 MWh of electricity per year which will be transmitted into the country’s national electricity grid. This clean, renewable wind power will supply electricity that would otherwise be generated by fossil-fuel power plants. 

This project will help to reduce approximately 927,100 metric tons of CO2 equivalent over the course of its 10 year lifespan. Training and employment opportunities will be provided during the construction, operation, and maintenance phases of the project. In addition, the local economy may benefit from the predicted rise in tourism to the area. 

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by producing clean energy

Community Benefits

  • Improves air quality
  • Creates local jobs
  • Provides economic benefits from increased tourism

Project Type

Energy

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

92,710 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

Alisios Holdings S.A.

Project Documents

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Crow Lake Wind Farm

Offset Program/Registry: Verified Carbon Standard

Estimated Annual Emission Reductions: 430,000 metric tons CO2

The Crow Lake Wind project is a zero emissions, grid-connected electricity generation source located on 36,000 acres in South Dakota. The commercial operation date of this project is February 1, 2011 and the entire project consists of 108 General Electric 1.5-megawatt turbines with a generating capacity of 162 megawatts (MW).

The electricity generated is provided to Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC), a not-for-profit, wholesale electric generation and transmission cooperative based in North Dakota. BEPC provides electricity to 2.8 million customers across 135 rural distribution companies in 9 states (MT, MN, IA, SD, ND, CO, NM, NB, WY).

The Crow Lake Wind Farm is the largest wind project owned solely by a cooperative in the United States. Seven of the turbines located at the Crow Lakes project site are owned by a group of 600 local community investors, called the South Dakota Wind Partners, and one turbine has been sold to the Mitchell Technical Institute in Mitchell, S.D.

Mitchell Technical Institute uses the turbine as part of the school’s wind turbine technology program. This unique relationship allows the school to sell the turbine’s output to BEPC while allowing access for generations of students and engineers to gain hands-on technical experience.