STORIES OF THE PEOPLE, PLACES & PARTNERS THAT MAKE TRAVEL AND TOURISM TICK

6 Reasons Why Your Business Should Offset Its Carbon Footprint

Whether your company is a hotel, tour operator, or restaurant, you probably know that your business is generating carbon emissions in one way or another. From heating your guest rooms to transporting your customers overseas, many of the day-to-day activities that keep your business running can also have an impact on the planet. In fact, the tourism industry is responsible for approximately 8% of global carbon emissions.

Minimizing these carbon emissions should always be your #1 priority, but no matter how many green practices you implement, producing at least some amount of carbon is practically inescapable. That’s where carbon offsetting comes in! 


Climate change is impacting your favorite vacation destinations. Here’s how.

Picture your favorite vacation spots. Now imagine your favorite ski resort with no snow, a coral reef barren of fish, or a tropical island without any beaches.

From the Great Barrier Reef to the Alps, many of the world’s most iconic destinations are in danger from climate change. Warming oceans are already bleaching coral reefs and as sea levels rise, entire islands could disappear underwater. A changing climate also bears bad news for ski destinations as experts predict that alpine resorts could lose up to 70% of their snow cover by the end of the century.

Read on to discover how climate change is impacting the places you visit and what the implications might be for your favorite vacation destinations.


Local man in traditional boat

How Coral Reefs Support Local Communities

When dreaming of a tropical getaway, we often envision stunning coastal vistas and coral reefs teeming with wildlife. As visitors, these underwater ecosystems quench our wanderlust by providing a remarkable backdrop and playground for adventure.  But coral reefs provide so much more than tourist gratification – they are incredibly important assets for the communities who live near them as well. About 40% of people live within 60 miles (100km) of the coast. Of these people, more than 275 million live in close proximity to coral reefs (within 30 km of reefs and less than 10 km from the coast). These nearby inhabitants often depend on reefs for their survival and well-being.
Kawesqar Community Tourism Project

Revitalizing the rich heritage of Patagonia’s indigenous people

“We cannot let our culture die.” These words still ring vividly. Earlier this year, leaders for the project “Pueblo Kawésqar” sat down with Kawésqar communities of Magallanes (Southern Chile). During one of the first meetings, members of the marginalised indigenous group voiced their desire to revitalise their culture and let others know about their history, heritage and customs.