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Envira Amazonia Carbon Offset Project

Envira Amazonia Project

Located in the Brazilian state of Acre, this project is protecting an area of tropical forest that would have otherwise been converted for lumber harvesting and cattle ranching. The avoided deforestation prevents emissions and maintains critical habitat for wildlife, while improving the livelihoods of communities living in the vicinity.

Where & Why

The Envira Amazonia Project is located in an area of the Southwestern Amazon that is heavily affected by deforestation. The project area is approximately 25 miles away from the city of Feijó, near Brazil’s borders with Peru and Bolivia. 

The Southwestern Amazon is an area of immense biodiversity. More than 20 threatened species and 40 endemic species can be found within this region including woolly monkeys, giant anteaters, spider monkeys, and giant armadillos. 

Along with this abundance of plants and animals, approximately 50 families live within the project area and the surrounding vicinity. These communities are highly dependent on the forest for their livelihoods. Most of the families are former rubber tappers, but these activities ceased when rubber prices crashed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Today, many families practice subsistence agriculture and raise small animals such as pigs, chickens and ducks. They rely on the forest for food, fuel, building materials, and medicinal plants.  Along with the forest, the nearby Envira, Jurupari, and Purus rivers provide critical services for the families that live in the area. This includes water for drinking and bathing, transportation routes, and food. 

Though communities live within the project area, the land is privately owned. Prior to the project, the land owner planned to clear-cut the forest and establish a large cattle ranch to generate income. Without this project, this conversion would have happened and the subsistence agriculture and small-scale cattle ranching by local families would likely shift to adjacent areas. 

Along with releasing carbon emissions into the air, the conversion of this forest into pasture land would jeopardize the survival of local communities and wipe out local biodiversity. Furthermore, critical functions of these forests, such as flood control, would be lost, and livestock farming could lead to river pollution.

How & Who

This project is avoiding the deforestation of 39,300 hectares of the Amazon rainforest. Over its initial 10 year crediting period, the project will reduce 12.5 million metric tons of CO2 by maintaining the forest’s existing carbon stocks. 

To ensure the forest remains intact, the land owner signed a voluntary agreement to forgo their planned deforestation activities and enable this conservation project. Specifically, the agreement prohibits the land owner from clearing the forest for logging, ranching, agriculture, road construction, or other purposes. In turn, the land owner receives revenue from the sale of carbon offset credits. These earnings replace the revenues they would have received from the planned logging and cattle ranching activities.

Along with preventing the planned conversion by the land owner, the project is also taking steps to mitigate unplanned deforestation. The project is accomplishing this by addressing the underlying pressures that are driving deforestation in the wider region. Several activities are being implemented to engage families living within and around the project area. A resident who is appreciated by the local community was hired as the project manager. Along with his assistant, he is conducting routine patrols to detect and halt deforestation.

Furthermore, the project is educating residents on improved agricultural techniques that are less destructive and use less land. Courses will be delivered on several key topics including alternatives to the use of fire in land preparation and improved pasture management. To ensure women are able to participate in these trainings, childcare will be provided during the courses.

To provide alternative income sources, the project will equip communities with the knowledge and skills to collect and sell sustainable forest products, such as açaí berries and medicinal plants. As rubber prices have rebounded, the project will also revive the local rubber tapping industry by cultivating rubber trees on deforested land and educating communities on best practices. These alternative economic activities will provide added value for local communities while reducing pressure on the forest. 

The project will also provide additional benefits that improve the living conditions of local communities. This includes building a health and dental clinic, installing community toilets, and distributing hygiene kits and medication. Furthermore, the project will strengthen local land rights by granting families ownership of the land they are already using. Many of the project activities will also boost community resilience to climate change. For instance, the agricultural courses will incorporate climate change adaptation techniques and the new health center will help to mitigate potential increases in mosquito-borne illnesses. 

By implementing this project and its associated social programs, deforestation in the region will be reduced, biodiversity will be preserved, and community livelihoods will be improved.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by preventing deforestation
  • Protects 39,300 hectares of tropical forest
  • Safeguards critical wildlife habitats

Community Benefits

  • Improves community access to healthcare services
  • Trains communities on sustainable agriculture
  • Creates alternative economic opportunities
  • Helps local families secure land tenure rights
  • Generates employment opportunities 
  • Improves sanitation and hygiene

Project Type

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

1.26 million metric tons CO2e (annual average for crediting period)

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

CarbonCo, Carbon Securities, and JR Agropecuária e Empreendimentos EIRELI

Project Documents

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Trocano Araretama forest carbon offset project area

Trocano Araretama Conservation Project

Located along the Madeira River, this project is protecting a vast area of the Brazilian Amazon that is under imminent threat of deforestation. By improving living conditions and strengthening environmental monitoring and awareness, this project will conserve this critical ecosystem while improving quality of life for local communities.

Where & Why

The Madeira River is one of the Amazon’s largest tributaries. The waterway runs more than 2,000 miles, serving as an important freshwater source and route for transportation in the Brazilian Amazon.

While major transportation routes like the Madeira open up access to more remote areas of the rainforest, this also means that they make deforestation easier. Oftentimes, this results in a fishbone pattern of deforestation, where parallel lines of deforestation occur off a main road.

The Trocano Araretama project is located on the banks of the Madeira in the Municipality of Santo Antônio de Borba. This area is home to an incredible array of animals including 2,500 species of birds and 2,500 species of fish. Howler monkeys, white-nosed sakis, jaguars, and river dolphins are just a few of the species that are found here. 

Unfortunately, this biodiverse region faces severe threats of deforestation. Along with the Madeira River, the area also borders major roadways, leaving it highly susceptible to illegal logging, the expansion of livestock farming and cattle ranching, and other drivers of deforestation. The lack of economic opportunities in the region exacerbate this problem as local communities resort to working for illegal logging companies in order to survive. Between 1991 and 2010, Borba’s population more than doubled, placing further pressure on the region’s precious forest resources. 

Without intervention, it is projected that there will be extensive deforestation in the project area within the next 20 years.

How & Who

This project is protecting more than one million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon from being lost to deforestation. By conserving this essential ecosystem, the project will ensure that the trees hold their current carbon stores and continue to remove emissions from the atmosphere. 

The project will prevent deforestation and address its root causes through a variety of activities, including:

  • Implementing a new, technology-driven monitoring and intervention system against the perpetrators of illegal deforestation.
  • Educating local communities on forests to foster environmental appreciation and activism.
  • Training and employing local inhabitants in land maintenance and conservation. 
  • Providing alternative livelihood opportunities for local people so that they no longer need to engage in illegal logging as a means of survival. In the longer-term, funds will be used to provide micro-loans and develop sustainable ecotourism.
  • Training residents on sustainable practices, such as small-scale sustainable agricultural practices that avoid the devastation caused by slash and burn.

The project funds will also be used to create additional benefits for communities and improve local standards of living. As there is currently no waste management in place, proceeds from the project will be used to establish sewage and waste systems. Furthermore, funds from the project will support the improvement of basic services, such as the deployment of mobile health units, distribution of water purification systems and renovation of schools, as well as the provision of professional training.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by preventing deforestation
  • Protects 1.3 million hectares of tropical rainforest
  • Conserves biodiversity by protecting the habitats of vulnerable and endemic species
  • Reduces environmental pollution by establishing waste management systems

Community Benefits

  • Supports improved water sanitation, education, and health
  • ​​Provides training to local communities
  • Provides employment alternatives for local communities

Project Type

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

3.2 million metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

Celestial Green Ventures PLC and Go Balance Ltd

Project Documents

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Maísa REDD+

This project is protecting an area of the Brazilian Amazon that is threatened by deforestation. By increasing the economic value of the standing forest and improving surveillance, the project aims to protect this critical habitat and create better living conditions for local inhabitants.

Where & Why

The endemic center of Belém is an area of immense biodiversity within the Brazilian Amazon. The region is home to more than 450 animal and plant species, many of which are found nowhere else on the planet. 

Unfortunately, this part of the Amazon has been severely deforested over the years, leaving the landscape fragmented and degraded. As new roads were constructed in recent decades, they enabled people to penetrate deeper into the forest and the population grew rapidly. This coupled with extreme poverty and weak law enforcement have made the region susceptible to an ongoing cycle of deforestation. Local communities are lured in by the financial incentives offered by illegal loggers and coal producers who are eager to cut down their trees. After the timber resources are depleted, the remaining vegetation is typically burned and cleared to grow crops or graze cattle. Once these pastures and croplands are degraded, more forests are cleared. To date, more than 75% of the region’s forest cover has been compromised. 

The loss of Brazil’s lush rainforest habitat poses a grave risk to species such as the black bearded saki monkeys and Kaapori capuchin monkeys, which are currently in critical danger of extinction. As the forests are stripped bare, their carbon stores are released into the atmosphere which contributes to global climate change.

How & Who

This project is protecting one of the largest remaining blocks of forest within Belém’s center of endemism. The project aims to keep the forest standing by addressing the main drivers of deforestation in the region. This includes developing alternative economic activities that promote forest conservation, such as harvesting acai berries or other non-wood forest products, and strengthening local producer cooperatives. These new opportunities will provide families with additional income so that they no longer need to resort to illegal logging or charcoal production. The project will also encourage the use of more productive and sustainable farming practices that minimize the need to clear more forest areas. Further efforts to curb illegal timber harvesting include using satellite images to identify possible sources of deforestation. 

Over the next 30 years, the project aims to avoid the deforestation of more than 15,000 acres of the Amazon rainforest.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by preventing deforestation
  • Protects 71,047 acres of forest cover
  • Conserves biodiversity by protecting the habitats of endangered species

Community Benefits

  • Increases income for impoverished communities 
  • Trains local producers on sustainable forest management and land use

Project Type

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

67,458 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standard

Project Developers

Biofilica

Project Documents

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Cambodia biogas

Cambodia Biodigesters

This project is installing biogas digesters in rural Cambodia, which convert animal manure into a renewable source of energy. By reducing the need to burn wood indoors, the project reduces greenhouse gas emissions, prevents deforestation, and improves indoor air quality.

Where & Why

In Cambodia, many rural families lack access to electricity and are forced to cook their meals over open wood fires. This releases harmful pollutants into the air which can cause health problems such as stroke, heart disease, and lung cancer. Worldwide, nearly 4 million people die each year as a result of indoor air pollution. 

Along with these health concerns, cooking over wood fires is also harmful to the environment. Sourcing the wood depletes local forest resources, while burning it releases high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. 

Relying on wood fuel also places an extra burden on women who are typically responsible for gathering and cooking over it. The more time that women spend collecting wood and cooking, the less time they have for education, work, or socializing with their family. 

At the same time, many rural Cambodian families raise livestock and struggle to dispose of their herd’s waste in a hygienic manner. This coupled with poor sanitation leads to diseases, such as diarrhea. Additionally, the cow or pig dung releases harmful methane emissions as it breaks down.

How & Who

This project is installing dome biogas digesters outside of households in rural Cambodia. To date, more than 27,000 digesters have been installed; this phase of the project aims to install 8,600 more. Local people are trained as masons and earn an income constructing the digesters. These digesters convert the animal waste into biogas – a much cleaner, renewable fuel source. The biogas is then piped into households where families can use it for cooking and lighting. Because families are able to use the manure produced by their own cows or pigs to feed the digesters, the biogas is a highly affordable energy source. 

Along with biogas, the digesters produce bio-slurry, which is the remaining treated animal waste. This bio-slurry is rich in nutrients and can be used by farmers to fertilize their fields and increase their crop yields. This reduces the need for harmful chemical fertilizers. Because the bio-slurry has been hygienically treated, the project also helps prevent diseases caused by poor animal waste management. 

Thanks to their new biogas fuel, families no longer need to prepare their meals over wood fires. As a result, the project improves indoor air quality and reduces deforestation. Each digester is expected to prevent around 3MT of CO2 emissions each year. 

The use of biogas also cuts down the amount of time that women spend on tasks like collecting wood, cooking over the fires, and cleaning soot off of their pots and pans. The project further promotes gender equality by ensuring women are included in trainings and village meetings.

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Fights deforestation
  • Produces organic fertilizer

Community Benefits

  • Trains local community members 
  • Creates jobs
  • Provides an affordable energy source
  • Improves indoor air quality 
  • Improves hygiene and health
  • Improves living conditions of women 
  • Increases local food security

Project Type

Energy

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

10,000 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standard

Project Developers

Cambodia’s National Biodigester Programme

Project Documents

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Jari Para Carbon Project

Jari Pará REDD+

This project is safeguarding an ecological corridor within the Brazilian Amazon by avoiding deforestation and restoring native vegetation. The project works with local communities to mitigate damaging land use practices, such as slash-and-burn agriculture, while promoting sustainable food production and diversified economic activities.

Where & Why

Located in the northern Brazilian state of Pará, the municipality of Almeirim is situated where the Paru and Jari tributaries flow into the Amazon River. This part of the Brazilian Amazon serves as an ecological corridor, connecting various ecosystems and wildlife habitats in the region. The swaths of tropical rainforest support a wide variety of plant and animal species, such as hibiscus, brazil nut trees, jaguars, and giant otters. The area is also of socio-economic importance and is home to hundreds of rural families. 

Unfortunately, this ecologically-valuable area is also under threat from extensive deforestation. The ‘slash-and-burn’ technique is used to clear forest areas for cattle ranching and infrastructure development. This involves cutting down trees and leaving them to dry before burning any remaining vegetation. This practice led to widespread fires in the area, destroying acres of natural habitat and releasing vast amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. 

The Amazon rainforest houses over 10% of the world’s biodiversity and stores around 70 billion tons of carbon dioxide. Further degradation and deforestation in the region could have major consequences on the whole world.

How & Who

This project will work with local communities to safeguard large areas of rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. By providing technical and organizational support, such as leadership workshops, networking opportunities and land use knowledge sharing, the project will help local farmers to diversify their agricultural products. By educating these communities on the benefits of sustainable practices, the project will mitigate forest-damaging activities in the area. 

The project also helps to maintain a seedling nursery of native plant species from the area which will be used to restore degraded lands. Species such as brazil nuts and açaí berries will also provide food security and can be distributed by local communities for economic gain.  There is a strong focus on developing cooperatives and leadership to improve local people’s professional and networking skills. This will help communities to market and sell the products they grow, enabling their livelihoods to become more sustainable.

Throughout the initial 30 year life span of the project, 50,480 hectares of deforestation will be avoided. This will protect 340 types of flora and 2,070 animal species, 133 of which are endangered. In total, over 270 families will be positively impacted by the project across 7 different communities.

Environmental Benefits

  • Protects over 700,000 acres of tropical rainforest
  • Preserves the habitat of 2,000+ unique animal species
  • Mitigates climate change by preventing deforestation

Community Benefits

  • Improves food security through sustainable food production
  • Offers training on social organization, cooperativism, and leadership
  • Diversifies economic activities to improve resiliency

Project Type

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

516,399 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

Biofilica

Project Documents

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Isangi REDD Carbon Project

Isangi REDD+

This project protects a large swath of rainforest in the Congo Basin by encouraging sustainable agricultural practices and reducing deforestation. By advancing education, healthcare, and economic opportunities, the project also improves the quality of life of local communities.

Where & Why

The Isangi Territory lies at the heart of the Congo River Basin, where the Congo and Lomami Rivers meet. The Congo Basin is home to the world’s second-largest tropical forest. This rich ecosystem teems with biodiversity including 14 types of primates, critically endangered forest elephants, and over 700 species of native trees. Tropical rainforests, such as those in the Isangi Territory, have a tremendous ability to act as carbon sinks. But in order to perform this vital ecological role, these forests must remain standing. 

The forests within the Isangi Territory are also home to more than 30 tribal villages. Poverty is an issue within these communities which struggle due to malnutrition, limited medical care, and sparse educational opportunities.  As the local population grows and food needs increase, forests in the area are under increasing pressure. Large swathes of tropical forest are chopped or burned down, primarily to make way for subsistence agriculture. In addition to losing their habitat, the wildlife species that reside in the forest are also threatened from bushmeat hunting. If existing farming practices continue there will be further deforestation and loss of biodiversity.

How & Who

This project protects 187,000 hectares of primary rainforest in Isangi Territory. It prevents CO2 emissions by halting logging within the project area and reducing the amount of forest that is converted into farmland. The project helps farmers adopt sustainable agricultural practices by teaching them new skills and providing the necessary seeds and resources. These new techniques will enable farmers to produce more crops on their existing land, thus reducing the need to clear additional forest area. Since 2009, 10 million metric tons of CO2e have been sequestered. 

By avoiding deforestation, the project not only mitigates climate change, but also conserves precious rainforest habitat and protects local biodiversity. The project also reduces threats to endangered species by introducing tilapia farming as an alternative to hunting.   

The project helps to alleviate poverty and improve the well-being of the 150,000 people that inhabit the region. Along with supporting food production, the project promotes economic development by creating local jobs and providing funding to new small-scale businesses. The project also supports the education of over 3,000 elementary school students and improves public health practices. 

Environmental Benefits

  • Mitigates climate change by preventing deforestation
  • Conserves wildlife habitat
  • Protects endangered species and native trees

Community Benefits

  • Promotes sustainable economic opportunities
  • Provides skills training for local villagers
  • Supports sustainable food production
  • Increases access to quality education 
  • Improves local healthcare

Project Type

Forests

Location

Annual CO2 Reduction

672,224 metric tons CO2e

SDGs Supported

Verification Standards

Project Developer

Jadora & SAFBOIS

Project Documents

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