Archive for May, 2015

Utila – Managing Its Tourism Challenges

  • Utila Harbor
    Just 11 miles long and two miles wide, Utila is the smallest of Honduras’ Caribbean Bay Islands.
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  • Utila Swimmer
    Because the world’s second longest reef runs along Utila, it’s a major destination for scuba divers.
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  • Utila Shark
    Whale sharks are protected in Honduras, and Utila is one of the few places that they can be seen year round.
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  • Utila Street
    A former pirates’ refuge, Utila retains a small-town feel. But that’s threatened by the growth of tourism and plans for new resort hotels.
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  • Utila Dive Map
    We are helping Utila and other members of the Sustainable Destinations Alliance of the Americas to manage challenges posed by tourism.
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  • Utila Signs
    Recycling, rainwater catchment, a coastal erosion study and improved access to tourist attractions are Utila’s immediate priorities.
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10 Millones Mejor

Video – Campaña “10 Millones Mejor”

Esta semana en el World Travel and Tourism Council’s Global Summit 2015 en Madrid, Sustainable Travel International anunció “10 Millones Mejor”, una campaña que incluye varios rubros de la industria del turismo para monitorear y aumentar los beneficios sociales, económicos y ambientales de los viajes turísticos. Esta campaña tiene como meta demostrar de manera tangible las mejoras en las vidas de al menos 10 millones de personas para el año 2025.

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Kiembe_samaki_Nov06_5_Chumbe

A New Drive for Tourism in Africa

In the Indian Ocean, about 20 miles off the coast off of mainland Zanzibar, sits Chumbe Island, a private nature reserve that was developed in 1991 for the conservation and sustainable management of the uninhabited slice of coral reef. Today, Chumbe features a fully protected marine sanctuary, a forest reserve inhabited by extremely rare and endangered animals, an eco-lodge and historical ruins. All reserve buildings are state-of-the-art and designed for zero environmental impact. And Chumbe’s park rangers—once local fishermen—are now trained, environmental educators who teach tourists and local communities about the importance of conservation.

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